Diabetes, Heart and Cardiovascular Diseases News Chronicle.  Diabetes, Cardiovascular and Heart Diseases
 Article 236
    Published on September 2, 2017


Enhanced risk for celiac disease in type 1 diabetes children

A study done by the researchers at the UNSW Medicine, Australia shows the prevalence of celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder among type 1 diabetes (T1D) kids due to shared genetic risk. Authors say five percent risk of celiac disease (CD) among type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients compared to one percent risk among common people.


Researchers checked the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) among 52,721 children and teens aged below 18 years with type 1 diabetes (T1D). They used type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients registries belonging to the United States, Australasia, United Kingdom and Germany/Austria. The prevalence of both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD) among kids varies in different countries. Their study shows

  • The overall prevalence of celiac disease (CD) was 3.5 percent, ranging from 1.9 percent in the United States to 7.7 percent in Australia
  • Prevalence of celiac disease (CD) among girls was 4.3 percent compared to 2.7 percent among boys
  • Children with celiac disease (CD) were diagnosed to type 1 diabetes (T1D) when they were at the age of 5.4 years compared to 7 years among children and teens without celiac disease (CD)
  • Children with celiac disease (CD) were likely to be short in length

Enhanced risk for celiac disease in type 1 diabetes child.

Authors stress the importance of regular screening for celiac disease (CD) in kids. Lead author of the study was Dr. Maria Craig, UNSW Medicine, Kensington, New South Wales (NSW), Australia. The study findings were published on June 29, 2017, in the Diabetes Care. Title of the article was "Prevalence of Celiac Disease in 52,721 Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: International Comparison Across Three Continents."




       
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Weight gain between pregnancies linked to the development of gestational diabetes

A study done by the Norwegian researchers at the University of Bergen, Norway shows the risk of the development of diabetes during next pregnancy among those women who gained weight after having a baby. Earlier studies show overweight before conception or high weight gain during the pregnancy are the risk factors for the development of gestational diabetes. Health complications arise to both baby and mother with gestational diabetes. Preferred weight gain during the pregnancy period from the start of pregnancy as per the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) (the earlier name was the Institute of Medicine) is as follows.


Pregnant women weight category Advised weight gain during pregnancy
Underweight women
(BMI less than 18.5)
28 to 40 pounds
Normal weight women
(BMI between 18.5 and 24.9)
25 to 35 pounds
Overweight women
(BMI between 25 to 29.9)
15 to 25 pounds
Obese women
(BMI over 30.0)
11 to 20 pounds

Researchers investigated diabetes risk among 24,198 women who gave birth between 2006 and 2014. Researchers recorded their body mass index (BMI) and gestational diabetes history when they got pregnant again. They observed following

  • The incidence of gestational diabetes was 1.8 percent among second-time pregnancies.
  • 36 percent of the women gained weight equal to or more than one BMI between the start of their first pregnancy and start of their second pregnancy. The risk of the development of diabetes during second pregnancy is more among these women compared to women whose weight was stable.
  • Risk of gestational diabetes doubles to those pregnant women who gained two BMI compared with women who gained less than one BMI.
  • Risk of gestational diabetes becomes five fold to those pregnant women who gained more than or equal to four BMI.
  • They observed the notable risk of gestational diabetes among those women whose weight was normal before their first pregnancy and gained weight during subsequent pregnancies.
  • They also observed risk reduction to diabetes during next pregnancy among overweight women who lost weight after previous delivery.

Weight gain between pregnancies linked to the development of gestational diabetes.

Lead author of the study was Linn Marie Sorbye, a public health researcher, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, the University of Bergen, Norway. The study findings were published on August 1, 2017, in the journal PLOS Medicine. Title of the article was "Gestational diabetes mellitus and interpregnancy weight change: A population-based cohort study."




       
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