Diabetes News Chronicle


Diabetes, Cardiovascular And Heart Diseases - 203

 

Published on June 13, 2017 at 05:30 AM GMT

Risk To Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Diseases With 2 Weeks Of Sedentary Life
Risk To Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Diseases With 2 Weeks Of Sedentary Life A study done by researchers at the University of Liverpool, UK shows decrease in metabolic health and muscle mass with just two week break or holiday from daily physical exercise. Health condition with reduced metabolic health and muscle mass due to 14 day break or holiday to daily physical activity may lead to chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), heart diseases etc. The current study findings shows importance of daily physical activity and adverse health consequence with sedentary behavior when an individual give 14 days or two week break or holiday to daily physical activity.

The British investigators conducted studies to find out the development of risk factors to chronic diseases when they give 14 days or two week break or holiday to daily physical activity among 28 healthy individuals with 25 years average age and 25 kg/m2 BMI. Investigators observed changes in body composition, decrease in cardio-respiratory fitness levels, increase in total fat in the central area of the body and reduction in skeletal muscle mass. Changes in the total body fat and accumulation of fat in the central area of the body is a major risk factor to the development of chronic diseases. This study was conducted by Dr Kelly Bowden-Davies and the investigating team was led by Dr Dan Cuthbertson, the University of Liverpool, UK. The study findings were presented at the European Congress on Obesity (ECO2017), held between 17-20 May, 2017 at Porto, Portugal.

Articles related to   Health Risks   |   Heart Diseases   |   Sedentary

 

Increase In Risk To Gestational Diabetes With Increase In Outdoor Temperatures
Increase In Risk To Gestational Diabetes With Increase In Outdoor Temperatures According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 9.2 percent of the pregnant women were affected by gestational diabetes (GD) in the United States during 2014. Earlier studies shows improvement to insulin sensitivity when body was exposed to cold temperature as body produces more heat to maintain body temperature. Cold atmosphere can improve insulin sensitivity of an individual as brown adipose tissue plays a protective role.

An observational study done by the researchers from the Mount Sinai Hospital, the St Michael's Hospital, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and the University of Toronto shows increase in risk to gestational diabetes (GD) with hot outdoor air temperature. Authors says as the incidents of gestational diabetes (GD) in women may continue to raise due to the consequence of global warming. The researchers examined 555,911 deliveries of 396,828 women, with an average age of 31 years between 2002 to 2014 (12 years duration). Researchers defined temperature less than or equal to 10℃ as cold temperature and average temperature of 24℃ as hot temperature. They conducted gestational diabetes (GD) screening after exposing the pregnant women for 30 days at the above temperatures.

Researchers found gestational diabetes in 4.6 percent of the pregnant women when exposed to cold temperature and in 7.7 percent of the pregnant women when exposed to hot temperature. The study shows six to nine percent increase in gestational diabetes (GD) with every 10℃ increase in atmospheric or outdoor temperature. A similar trend was found between two pregnancies of a single mother with respect to temperature differences. Researchers observed direct association between risk to the development of gestational diabetes (GD) and outdoor temperature among 400,000 pregnant women. Lead author of the study was Dr Gillian Booth, a researcher at St Michael's and ICES and the study findings were published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ).

Gestational diabetes : A gestational diabetes (GD) is a temporary form of diabetes or high sugar levels affecting some women (with no diabetes history) during pregnancy as insulin resistance was triggered by placenta hormone.

Articles related to   Health Risk   |   Gestational

 

 

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